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June 1, 2021

Podcast Power: Backlisted

 

How John Mitchinson and Andy Miller enhance book culture through podcasting

Photo: Recording the Huysmans podcast at Shakespeare & Co (L to R: Adam Biles, Andy Miller, Sylvia Beach Whitman & John Mitchinson)
Each episode of Backlisted "features a guest (usually a writer) who has chosen a book they love and which they think deserves a wider audience. Though sponsored by [...] Unbound, it isn’t about selling new product: it’s about how and why some books stand the test of time."
From Miller and Mitchinson: 

"Our listeners are committed, adventurous readers. As well as lively, well-informed discussion we include readings and audio clips of the featured author. Our job is to make you want to read the book."

And their efforts are paying off: 

"Backlisted’s listener base is growing rapidly: total plays so far in 2018 have equalled the entire number of plays we had in 2016. This seems amazing to us, as the books chosen are often obscure (who guessed more than 8,000 people want to listen to an hour on Anita Brookner!). Backlisted is regularly in the Literature Top 10 on iTunes (with over a hundred five-star reviews), we have a burgeoning programme of live recordings at book festivals and some bookshops even have special ‘Backlisted’ tables."
Don't Miss This! 
Virtual Bookish Events from Sarah Nicolas via LiveWriters
For MANY MORE events this week, click here!

Podcast News

Book Pages 

Writers' Block: 88 Cups of Tea

This is a podcast and online platform "for creative writers who look for guidance in their storytelling journey and connection to a community, fostering year-round conversations around the personal and professional life of a writer." Through their episodes, team members "explore and unpack conversations that touch on topics like overcoming rejections and challenges, querying tips and crafting advice, lifestyle habits that support the heart and the soul, what it means to be Human while navigating a creative path, and more." Visit the website for great content, like this episode featuring Daniel Jose Older "On Reaching the Heart of Your Story." 
Pub Club: Getting into Comics with Tim Paige 

Getting Into Comics is a podcast for novices and seasoned comic collectors alike. Host Tim Paige walks listeners through books he's reading, breaks down stories, and above all, makes sure everyone feels welcomed into the world of comics.

As Paige says, "Whether you’ve never picked up a comic book in your life, or you read them when you were younger and want to pick it back up again, that’s what Getting Into Comics is all about."

Give this one a try by listening to Issue 10: Back (Like Jean Grey ... No Matter What). Also available on iTunes and Stitcher. And for X-Men lovers, there is more where this came from! 

Talk To Us


We built LiveWriters to serve writers, readers, publishers, and the podcasting community. Since you are our audience, please let us know what we can do to make LiveWriters better. Send suggestions, ideas, and any criticisms that will improve LiveWriters and make it a better and more useful experience to David Wilk at david@livewriters.com.

If you like what we are doing, please share the site with your friends. You can follow us on Twitter @livewriters. 

If you'd like to advertise to an audience that loves books and reading, or if you'd like to become a sponsor, write to david@livewriters.com.  

Thanks for all your support and for being part of this community.

-David
                                                                                                                                 Image by freepik.com.

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May 18, 2021


Podcast Profile

 

LiveWriters chats with Sarah Enni of First Draft with Sarah Enni

  

Q: The story of how you started the podcast, First Draft with Sarah Enni, is pretty inspirational. What has been most surprising to you about how the show has grown and gained a following? 
A: The most surprising thing to me personally has been my inexhaustible energy for doing the show. I'm still interested in it, somehow, and though the show's format and regularity have been constants, it feels like something that shifts and changes over time. I've been pleasantly surprised at how much I love the audio format and the art of conversation. The most surprising thing about the show's following is how impossible the show's impact is to measure, or anticipate. Some listeners have been with me from the beginning and never miss an episode. Some guests tell me it's been a career goal to be on the show; others I connect with hear about the show for the first time when they're invited to appear as guests. It's beautiful in that way, and keeps me from being obsessed with numbers.
Q: What is one episode or guest interview that sticks out as being memorable to you, and why?

A: There have been so many! When a guest I've never met comes on the show and we instantly connect, it's so energizing and magical. That has happened with Rufi Thorpe, Kristin Cashore, Marla Frazee, Leah Johnson, Gretchen Rubin, and more. And last year when I read The Bear and the Moon, written by Matthew Burgess and illustrated by Cátia Chien, I immediately burst into tears. And I did not stop crying for about a week, including during our interview. They were so gracious and respectful of my raw emotional state. Without the show, I never would have read that book--it's a picture book! I am not its target audience!--yet it was easily one of the most impactful books of 2020 for me.
Q: Track Changes is a newer venture that grew out of First Draft. Can you talk about why you expanded that and your main goals for the show?
A: I've been doing Track Changes for more than six years, yet much of the feedback I get from my audience includes somewhat simple questions about how publishing works. I realized that, though you can learn a ton about our industry from listening to First Draft, there was nothing to establish a baseline of understanding for my audience--a shared vocabulary and foundation of knowledge about publishing. And much about book publishing is opaque and difficult to understand. So I created the Track Changes mini-series, which follows one writer through the traditional publication process and gets input from professionals at every stage. It also gave me the opportunity to try narrative non-fiction audio, which I enjoyed so much. I hope Track Changes serves as an evergreen touchstone for people just learning about how to be a professional writer.
Don't Miss This! 
Virtual Bookish Events from Sarah Nicolas via LiveWriters
 
For MANY MORE events this week, click here!

Podcast News

Book Pages 

Reading Nook: Bad on Paper Podcast

In this podcast, real-life best friends Grace Atwood and Becca Freeman host a monthly virtual book club and you're invited! They talk about the featured book and then some--careers, dating, life--with guests. Subscribe on Apple Podcasts here. Visit the website to hear past book club episodes, like this one on American Spy by Lauren Wilkinson, when the duo was joined (remotely) by Wilkinson herself.
Pub Club: How Books Are Made  

Host Arthur Atwell "speaks to book-making leaders about design, production, marketing, distribution, and technology" in this podcast. It's worth a listen for writers looking to get published, and for publishers looking for new ideas. 
The podcast is relatively new, with a trailer that launched Aug. 8, 2020. Atwell has created 15 episodes since then, offering listeners topics like "Children's illustration, skills, and tools" and "Ebooks, Arabic, lions, vampires."

Each episode features a special guest with experience in the field, and Atwell includes all relevant links for every show on his website. 

Talk To Us

We built LiveWriters to serve writers, readers, publishers, and the podcasting community. Since you are our audience, please let us know what we can do to make LiveWriters better. Send suggestions, ideas, and any criticisms that will improve LiveWriters and make it a better and more useful experience to David Wilk at david@livewriters.com.

If you like what we are doing, please share the site with your friends. You can follow us on Twitter @livewriters. 

If you'd like to advertise to an audience that loves books and reading, or if you'd like to become a sponsor, write to david@livewriters.com.  

Thanks for all your support and for being part of this community.

-David
                                                                                                                                 Image by freepik.com.

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May 4, 2021

Vantage Points

 

LiveWriters chats with Dan Blank of WeGrowMedia

  
Q: You are the founder of WeGrowMedia, where you help writers and other creatives develop a human-centered approach to marketing and reaching their audience. What is one simple marketing step that new writers often miss out on? Why do you think that is?
A: They wait to long to learn how to talk about what they create, and engage with other people around that. Their reasons are often logical. Perhaps they feel it is better to wait until their writing is "finished" or until someone reputable publishes it for them. But by this time, it is too late. They are rushing to shout about their work without having developed an audience supporting who they are and why they create. What I would encourage new writers to do is two-fold. First is to regularly share what you create and why. You can do this on social media, an email newsletter, video or so many other channels. The second is to develop professional colleagues. To do so, don't vie for the attention of "influencers," instead identify who else writers and reads the kind of work you create. Email them, follow them on social media, find small ways to engage. 
Q: Based on your experiences, what do you see as the link between writing and podcasting? How can one benefit the other? 

A: The impetus for writing and podcast is often similar. Usually it is focused on either storytelling or educating. So many podcasts have embraced long-form storytelling or interviews. Likewise, there are lessons to be learned, sometimes directly through a topic, and other times as the moral of a story. This is similar to why people write memoir, fiction, and nonfiction. The person who listens to a podcast may have the same goal of someone who reads a book: to escape into a story, to connect with the world in a new way, and to learn something in the process. 
Q: Tell readers about your book. What inspired you to write it, and what do readers most often tell you they admire about it? 

A: 
The idea behind Be the Gateway happened unexpectedly. Several years ago I was recording daily videos for some writers I was working with, and one day I came up with this idea of our careers as writers being akin to a gateway that we build and walk people through. I started recording a video and riffed on this idea. The writers I was working with loved it, so I wrote a public blog post about it too, and I kept getting great feedback.
It's intriguing for me to consider that I have the moment of ideation captured on video for this book. The concept is basically to make marketing feel like an authentic and approachable pursuit for writers and artists. The book is broken down into three parts, giving practical ways to understand how to communicate what you create and why, how to better find and get to know your ideal readers, and then how to engage with them in a manner that feels natural. All the while, developing your platform as a writer and understanding how to market your books
LEARN TO PODCAST WITH LIVEWRITERS


Digital audio continues to grow like crazy. More people than ever have learned to love audiobooks — and now podcasts.

What better way for an author or publisher to communicate with readers than with a podcast? You’re live, authentic, and powerful! People want to hear your voice. Let LiveWriters help!       

Podcast News

Book Pages 

Move Beyond the 'LIKE' Button:

"I believe you should CONNECT TO A PERSON, NOT AN AUDIENCE. Connecting your work to others should be a process of deep connection, not one of trying to amass faceless followers, judging your success on likes and reshares. It is about connecting through writing and art, and how that changes someone."

-- Dan Blank, WeGrowMedia
Replay 

For this Replay pick, we recommend the March 18, 2021 episode of WritersCast: The Voice of Writing with host David Wilk. This episode features an interview with Claudio Saunt, author of Unworthy Republic: The Dispossession of Native Americans and the Road to Indian Territory
Saunt, who is a teacher and a historian as well as an author, tells Wilk that his inspiration to write Unworthy Republic came partly from his own family's history. His grandfather, a Hungarian Jew, had escaped Hungary in 1938 and corresponded with relatives up until they were deported by Nazis to Auschwitz in 1944. Saunt inherited and translated those letters, which led him to think about other atrocities of deportation, including that which happened in the United States in the 1830s--Indian Removal. 

Saunt also realized that, as a teacher, he wasn't excited about assigning to his students the books already written on the topic, many of which told only part of the story. So, he did what anyone with his research interests and writing capabilities would do--he created the full account that had been missing. 
 
In this book, Wilk explains, "Saunt makes three related core arguments: 'The state-administered mass expulsion of indigenous people was unprecedented, it was a turning point for indigenous peoples and for the United States, and it was far from inevitable.'" Listen to the interview and then pick up the book for the real story of how closely racism, cruelty, and greed intertwined--from north to south--to kill, harm, and dispossess thousands of Native Americans to make the white invaders richer. 

Unworthy Republic has earned many accolades, including being a Finalist for the 2020 National Book Award for Nonfiction, being named a Top Ten Best Book of 2020 by the Washington Post and Publishers Weekly, and being called a New York Times Critics' Top Book of 2020. 


Talk To Us


We built LiveWriters to serve writers, readers, publishers, and the podcasting community. Since you are our audience, please let us know what we can do to make LiveWriters better. Send suggestions, ideas, and any criticisms that will improve LiveWriters and make it a better and more useful experience to David Wilk at david@livewriters.com.

If you like what we are doing, please share the site with your friends. You can follow us on Twitter @livewriters. 

If you'd like to advertise to an audience that loves books and reading, or if you'd like to become a sponsor, write to david@livewriters.com.  

Thanks for all your support and for being part of this community.

-David
                                                                                                                                 Image by freepik.com.

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April 20, 2021

Podcast Profile

 

LiveWriters chats with Clifford Brooks of Dante's Old South Radio Show

  
Q: Dante's Old South Radio Show offers listeners something different--
variety. What is your mission with this broadcast? And has that
evolved, or does it remain true to your original vision?
A: When WUTC/NPR offered me time on their schedule I jumped at the chance. I wanted unheard voices and voices from rarely heard vocations--creative vocations--and there’s an art to everything. Dante's Old South upends negative stereotypes and highlights the diversity that makes us a people. We prove laughter, art, and healthy conversation are food for the soul. 

Since the first show six years ago I’ve honed the number of guests on the show, added music to prevent monotony, and focused on all artists--magicians, mathematicians, architects, landscapers, lawyers, teachers, etcetera--all genres of creators. Of course, we make room for poets, novelists, essayists, visual artists, and storytellers. “Art is life lived well.” I showcase those who’ve found, or are finding, contentment in their passion. I delve into how they make the business of art work. Folks who understand art is a business.

The show evolved in design, but its mission remains unchanged.
Q: You are also an author and an editor. How do your different titles and positions inform one another? Do you keep those "identities" separate, or do you always wear all three hats at the same time? 

A: All my hats fuse into one love. I’m the same canine all day. People fascinate me, but my autism makes social interaction tough. I write poetry about life. I cover life in all areas of my interests. Interviewing people for The Blue Mountain Review and Dante’s Old South allows me to gel with folks without the social stress.
All my efforts intertwine so that no detail is lost, no one feels unheard, and I don’t work myself to death. If you hear someone on the show, chances are you’ll find out more in the magazine. The overlap is attractive to those with new products or vision. It gives readers and listeners a panoramic view of our guests.
Q: Tell readers about The Southern Collective Experience. What is it, and how do its members support one another? What are the best parts of that community you have founded? 

A:  I never thought an idea to build a safe place for professional artists to meet and share good news would develop into a company. In 2013 my first book found traction. I attended several literary events and found most clogged with egos. Art is not a small pool with too many big fish. It’s an expanse of ocean with too many fish that don’t want to share. Few are honestly happy to see others get ahead. I feel that when we rise together the ascent proves a lasting trajectory.

The Southern Collective Experience is that safe place. We often talk about our troubles, projects, and celebrate together when one of us breaks the glass ceiling. It’s a company devoted to the business and family of art. There are community programs and charities we support. Right now, our mainstays are Autism Speaks and Mostly Mutts. Once Covid lifts we’ve an array of community outreach events to bring culture and hope back to adults and children.

Then we had the idea for a magazine, but not one like others we followed. We created The Blue Mountain Review to be a journal of culture. Our ongoing goal is to capture all of life and distill it on the page and radio. The same energy went into Dante’s Old South and our festival-style reading/music/visual art events. We thrive because we work together.

Our membership is from all over the country. Our motto is, “We’re all south of somewhere.” We’ve folks from all walks of life with brilliance that can’t, and shouldn’t, be ignored. We laugh a great deal. Every day they astound me with the heights they’re able to reach. “I” am not the SCE. I simply want more people to know my family exists.

I couldn’t choose a favorite part. All of it, the projects and everyone in it, are my equals. I love them very much.
PODCASTING A to Z
 

Whether you are a podcasting novice or have been doing this fun activity for years, LiveWriters can help in a variety of ways.

"We work with a variety of established service providers with years of experience in audio and podcast production, as well as marketing experts, coaches, marketing and promotion experts, and much more."   

Podcast News

Book Pages 

Tip for New Podcasters:

"Publish 3 to 5 episodes when you first launch. From our research, the very minimum number of episodes to have at launch is three. In general, the more the merrier. We had seven interviews complete before we launched our podcast, with three episodes planned for launch day and two apiece for the following two weeks."

-- Kevan Lee, "How to Promote a Podcast: 10 Strategies to Try"
Replay 

For this Replay pick, we recommend the April 15, 2021 episode of On the Margin with Ethelbert Miller. This episode features an interview with Robin Broad and John Cavanagh, authors of The Water Defenders: How Ordinary People Saved a Country from Corporate Greed
On the Margin with Ethelbert Miller "explore[s] the link between culture and politics, offering the community a better understanding of the motion of history." It's great for book lovers, writers, and those involved in libraries and other literary institutions. The show airs on WPFW in Washington, D.C., and is available on Apple Podcasts.

Through Miller's interview with Broad and Cavanagh, listeners learn more about the harrowing story of adventure, adversity, and ultimately, victory, that took place in El Salvador when community members uncovered the devastating effects of gold mining on their local environment.
With the calamity of climate change looming over all of us, Broad's and Cavanagh's account is just the type of inspiration and hope we need. Give this episode a listen, then order their book!  


Talk To Us


We built LiveWriters to serve writers, readers, publishers, and the podcasting community. Since you are our audience, please let us know what we can do to make LiveWriters better. Send suggestions, ideas, and any criticisms that will improve LiveWriters and make it a better and more useful experience to David Wilk at david@livewriters.com.

If you like what we are doing, please share the site with your friends. You can follow us on Twitter @livewriters. 

If you'd like to advertise to an audience that loves books and reading, or if you'd like to become a sponsor, write to david@livewriters.com.  

Thanks for all your support and for being part of this community.

-David
                                                                                                                                 Image by freepik.com.

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April 6, 2021

Podcast Profile

 

LiveWriters chats with Jason Meuschke of the Sample Chapter Podcast

  
Q: You explore a variety of genres on the Sample Chapter Podcast. Are the genres and books chosen randomly, or is there a reason you feature the books you do when you do? 
A: I've opened the show to all genres, which makes it random fun from week to week, not knowing what to expect. The idea behind it was to create a place that welcomes all genres, allowing for a broader audience. There could be romance one week and SciFi the next, or poetry, or horror, western, crime thriller. You just never know! I myself read everything so my TBR list is constantly growing, thanks to the amazing guest authors and their incredible books. As for selecting the author, or book, I'm fortunate now to have a fairly steady list of requests from authors wanting to be a part of the show. I do, however, keep an eye on my backlist, and will occasionally reach out for one genre or another if it's been a while to sort of keep a healthy balance. 
Q: What is one of your favorite episodes, and what made that one memorable for you?

A: The easy answer here would be last October when I got to interview Hollywood actor, Lou Diamond Phillips! I had a blast speaking with him and he was so open to discussing his fiction writing craft, which was a new venture for him. Plus his chapter reading was incredible! But honestly, while talking with someone established like LDP, or author Steve Alten of the MEG series and movie is a ton of fun for me personally, I have just as much if not more fun speaking with first-time authors. Hearing about that passion project that burned in their brain for years on end before finally writing--it just never gets old.
Q: What is something you know now that you wish you would have known when you started the podcast? 

A: Hmm, that's kind of tough because I think it's a lot of little things and much of it goes along with writing! Like the importance of keeping a schedule and working on it regularly. Needing a website and email for people to learn more. Oddly enough, the show has actually helped my writing as well. Writing a blurb each week for a new episode has given me better insight into writing blurbs for my books, which most authors hate doing! 
NEED A LITTLE HELP?

If you are in need of technical support or assistance in starting or building a podcast, LiveWriters can help. We have technical staff available for all aspects of podcasting, especially audio support, and can also help with content development and marketing efforts. Contact david@livewriters.com for more information.

Podcast News

Book Pages 

"[E]ven if you have the best podcast topic with the best setup and the best audio, if you aren't a great host, then listeners won't tune in. So, it is vital to work on improving your hosting abilities in addition to improving your podcast setup and audio quality."

-- Michelle Ruoff, "10 Ways to Be a Great Podcast Host"
Microphone

Replay 

 

For this Replay pick, we recommend "Brian O'Leary on the Future of Publishing" (March 31) from BookSmarts with Joshua Tallent. A transcript is available on the website.

In this episode, Tallent talks with Brian O'Leary, executive director of the Book Industry Study Group, or BISG, the U.S. book industry's trade organization. The interview focuses both on areas where O'Leary sees the industry struggling, and where he sees opportunities for growth. 

O'Leary, who has decades of experience in the publishing world, shares his background, explains the work of the BISG, and discusses how technology and the pandemic have changed reading and access. Hint: It has a lot to do with expansion and affordability! Give the episode a listen or read to learn more.

Talk To Us

 

We built LiveWriters to serve writers, readers, publishers, and the podcasting community. Since you are our audience, please let us know what we can do to make LiveWriters better. Send suggestions, ideas, and any criticisms that will improve LiveWriters and make it a better and more useful experience to David Wilk at david@livewriters.com.

If you like what we are doing, please share the site with your friends. You can follow us on Twitter @livewriters.

If you'd like to advertise to an audience that loves books and reading, or if you'd like to become a sponsor, write to david@livewriters.com.

Thanks for all your support and for being part of this community.

-David

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March 23, 2021

Podcast Profile

 

   LiveWriters chats with Jeremy Kitchen,
Mike Sack, and
Jamie Trecker of Chicago's
Eye 94 Podcast


Photos: Jeremy Kitchen (top left), Mike Sack and daughter Rosalie (lower right), Jamie Trecker (bottom left), Shanna Van Volt (bottom right)

Q: How did the three of you get the Eye 94 podcast going? What was your initial motivation?
A: (Mike) It was something that came about naturally through our connections to each other in the neighborhood (Bridgeport). Both Jamie and I are longtime patrons of the Daley branch library (Jeremy is the manager). Jeremy and I were already friends and had been talking about starting a literary magazine for some time, with nothing but the name in place—Eye 94. Jamie is the station manager at WLPN and on a whim Jeremy asked if there were any radio slots available, and voila. Jeremy filled out an application for a generic show on books and we did a pilot show live on the air (105.5 FM) maybe a couple weeks later. We just talked about books we liked and were reading at the time. We each read a passage or two from some books. We read them way, way too fast. Jamie had to tell us to slow down. We wrapped and figured it was 50/50 we'd go on again. It was just a basic hunger for reading and finding new things to read. We had no idea it would lead to interviewing some of the great writers we've had on the show, or that we'd have Shanna doing professional v/o readings of books with major contemporary jazz artists playing in the background. Fundamentally, I think our motivation remains the same. We love reading lots of different kinds of books and bantering about them. (BTW: Jamie does all the editing and production work on the show, in addition to transferring the audio files from radio to podcast; it's really a Chicago radio show first, a podcast second.) 

Q: You have had so many great guests. Is there one who sticks out in your memory as being particularly significant? What made that experience special?

A: (Jeremy) I think Chicago is underrated as far as being considered a literary city. We have had some heavy hitters, Ling Ma, Catherine Lacey, and our friend Maryse Meijer. Maryse is the kind of guest we love, humble and an extraordinary writer. Catherine Lacey should be up there with the greats, and Ling Ma needs not introduction. Non-Chicago I am going with Gary Indiana and Helen DeWitt. Two of my literary heroes, it was an honor to interview those two.

Q: What are some goals you have for the podcast in the future? What can loyal fans AND new listeners look forward to?
A:  (Jamie) I think we hope to keep getting entertaining and insightful people from across the book world. While we mainly speak with authors, we are the rare show that also chats with editors, translators and publishers. In a rarity, we’re also going to be speaking with one of the subjects of a book on a forthcoming show, so that should be pretty novel! One thing we’re really proud of also is the readings we present: a lot of authors — many of whom would otherwise never get to have their book read or scored — have told us it's a favorite part of the show, and Shanna puts a lot of time into that to make sure they come out great. Going forward we have the dream of doing a live show with the full band and the readings, but the pandemic has put a damper on that for a bit. (Also, Patricia Lockwood, if you’re reading this: we’d love to get you on the show.)

Podcast News

Book Pages 

"[I]f you’ve got an echoey space you’ll need to do something about it because otherwise, it’ll sound like you’re recording your podcast in a toilet. And while podcasting is supposed to be an intimate experience, it’s not supposed to be that intimate."           
-Rachel Corbett, "How to Build a Voice Over Booth at Home for Less Than $30"

Replay 

Our Replay pick for this issue is "Poetic Forms" from Burning Bright: Voices from Passager (March 2, 2021).

In each short episode of Burning Bright, host Jon Shorr introduces poetry or prose that has been featured in the journal Passager, which only publishes work from writers over the age of 50. Like its authors, Passager proves the value of experience--it has published over 60 print issues, and is still going strong. In fact, copies often sell out! 

In "Poetic Forms," Shorr reads a series of haiku written by Philip Allen (Issue 70), terzanelles written by Sarah Yerkes, and a "Golden Shovel Poem" written by Clarinda Harriss (Issue 64). Shorr also describes each of these poetic forms and tells listeners how to get their hands on physical copies. 

Once you listen to an episode of Burning Bright, you'll find yourself listening to "just one more" more than once. It's the perfect podcast to put on for a short commute, or for a quick dose of art and culture with your morning cup of coffee.   

Correction: Manuela Boyda is the creator of the Lantigua Williams & Co.'s Podcasting, Seriously newsletter. Subscribe here.

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We built LiveWriters to serve writers, readers, publishers, and the podcasting community. Since you are our audience, please let us know what we can do to make LiveWriters better. Send suggestions, ideas, and any criticisms that will improve LiveWriters and make it a better and more useful experience to David Wilk at david@livewriters.com.

If you like what we are doing, please share the site with your friends. You can follow us on Twitter @livewriters.

And if you'd like to advertise to an audience that loves books and reading, or if you'd like to become a sponsor, write to david@livewriters.com.

Thanks for all your support and for being part of this community.

-David

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March 9, 2021


Podcast Profile

 

LiveWriters chats with Jenn Northington of 
Book Riot's "Get Booked"

 
 
Photo credit Swapna Krishna


Q: Get Booked is pretty huge. How has the show evolved over time? What motivated those changes or additions? 
A: The show has actually changed very little since Amanda started it, now that I think about it! It did take a little while to build up questions, but we've had no shortage for some years now; in fact, I think it's safe to declare that we'll never be able to answer every one we've gotten. (Sorry, y'all!) Amanda and I do occasionally record themed shows that aren't specific-question based (for instance, the February 25th "Cozy Show") when we notice we're getting lots of repeats around a particular topic, or if there's a theme that seems timely related to what's going on in the book world. And we'll have guests from time to time, usually based on when one or the other of us is traveling. But otherwise, it's what it says on the tin!
Q: Lots of podcast-hopefuls weigh the decision to have a cohost or to go it alone. What are the advantages of podcasting as a pair?

A: All of our main shows at Book Riot are paired, and there's a reason for that; it's extremely hard to do anything longer than a few minutes solo and maintain energy and interest! Having someone to bounce ideas off of, interact with, get differing opinions, you get the idea--it makes a world of difference. At least for me, The Handsells are as long as I can go without a cohost and feel like I'm tired of hearing myself talk, much less what listeners are interested in, and those generally aren't more than five or so minutes. Plus, I genuinely love hearing about Amanda's picks (and her dog, Petunia forever).
Q: What elements of each book do you consider before you recommend it? What characteristics does a book have to have to make the cut?

A: Well, that all depends on the question! Sometimes people are looking for very specific plot elements, or genres, or atmosphere, or character types, or combinations of those things. I do my best to match as many as possible, although longtime listeners will know I sometimes go off-the-rails when I get focused on a particular aspect of a question. And at least for me, I don't have to personally love a book to recommend it; I just need to believe it will work for the person looking for the recommendation. That doesn't mean anything goes; we have pretty enshrined values here at Book Riot around social justice, intersectional feminism, and promoting marginalized voices. And there are more than enough books to pick from!

Podcast News


 

Book Pages 

Pod Hack 

From Lantigua Williams & Co.'s Podcasting, Seriously Newsletter
 

Be very clear on who your audience is. That is the foundation for creating a successful show. Juleyka likes to say, "If you're making a podcast for everyone, you're not making a podcast for anyone." Who is your ideal listener? What do they look like? How old are they? Are they single? Married with kids? Where do they live? What are their hobbies and interests?

Start by creating an avatar— a hypothetical person who embodies your ideal listener. Build a psychographic profile around your listener that answers the questions above. To build, grow and monetize your show, you need to put it in front of the right audience. Being clear on who you're making the show for from the start will help you avoid wasting time and resources focusing on people that aren't part of this group. And the better you know your audience, the more effectively you can attract advertisers who want to reach them.


Listen to this episode on Latina to Latina where Juleyka talks about creating a successful podcast by defining your listeners first.

(Learn more about creator Manuela Bedoya here!)

Replay 

For this Replay pick, we recommend readers and listeners check out "The Brothers Mankiewicz: Hope, Heartbreak, and Hollywood Classics by Sydney Ladensohn Stern" (Feb. 27) from WritersCast with host David Wilk. 

WritersCast regularly features one-of-a-kind author interviews, and its home website, writerscast.com, also takes readers and listeners to Publishing Talks, interviews with publishers; book news; readings and events; and more. Archives go back to 2008, so it's also a great source of information on talk-worthy backlist titles. 

In his interview with Ladensohn, Wilk dives into Hollywood history, what it's like for an author to dig that deeply into the lives of others, tips on hunting through historical records, and the particular challenges of writing a dual biography. As often is the case, Ladensohn explains, real-life "characters" can prove to be more commanding, more impressive, and more complex than fictional protagonists, and Hollywood in the early 20th century was a fascinating backdrop for the dramas we would marvel at so many years later. Give this episode a listen to find out why. 

Talk To Us

We built LiveWriters to serve writers, readers, publishers, and the podcasting community. Since you are our audience, please let us know what we can do to make LiveWriters better. Send suggestions, ideas, and any criticisms that will improve LiveWriters and make it a better and more useful experience to David Wilk at david@livewriters.com.

If you like what we are doing, please share the site with your friends. You can follow us on Twitter @livewriters.

And if you'd like to advertise to an audience that loves books and reading, or if you'd like to become a sponsor, write to david@livewriters.com.

Thanks for all your support and for being part of this community.

-David

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Copyright (C) 2021 LiveWriters. All rights reserved.

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286 Curtis Ave
Stratford, CT 06615-7613

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February 23, 2021

Podcast Profile

 

   LiveWriters chats with    JW McAteer and Kevin McMahon of the Story Discovery Podcast and Onyx Publications


Photos: JW (left), Kevin (below)

Q: Tell readers about Onyx Publications and the new Etched Onyx magazine (accepting submissions until March 5). What is your mission? Why did you start the venture?
A: We started Onyx Publications because as aspiring writers ourselves, we understand the challenge of getting your work to a broader audience. We also understand that for the most part, writers just want their stories to be alive, out there in the world. Our mission is to provide an accessible path for writers and poets to showcase their work and broaden their reach, so that readers across the globe can discover new stories. We know that writing is a process that requires continuous investment of time, effort, and experience. The idea is simply to share our experience and invest some of our time, in the hopes that we all become better writers through this endeavor.

Q: How does the Story Discovery Podcast complement the magazine?
A: One of the things we love most about Onyx Publications, besides reading the amazing stories that people tell, is the podcast. There is just something special about hearing your own work, your own words, being read aloud by someone else. Podcasts make storytelling accessible, and can reach anyone in the world with an internet connection. For each podcast, we first narrate the story, so listeners who are just looking for good short stories, poems, or flash fiction, can find them and listen. After the narration, Kevin and I interview the author and talk writing craft a bit, but it’s also a chance to get to know the authors and just have a conversation. The podcast gives an extra dimension to Etched Onyx magazine. You can read the story, or you can hear the story, it’s up to you. And if you want to go deep, you can even get to know the authors a little bit. We think this helps us stand out and provides a larger platform for writers to express their voice.
Q: What is your favorite part about hosting a podcast? What keeps you excited for each new episode? 
A: You never know what you’re going to get! This is the best part about talking with writers and it’s been so much fun. Writers are, well, let’s be honest, characters in and of themselves. We generally talk about the writing craft just to get into the mindset of the writers, but I’d say 100% of the time we veer off into some crazy subject, like bear attacks, or story characters who have befriended their creators, or their favorite emotions (and it’s not what you think!). So, yep, getting excited about each episode is easy, it’s like reading a good book, we don’t know where it’s going to lead or how it’ll turn out, but we know it’ll be a fun ride!

Podcast News

Book Pages 

Brooklyn Lawyer Bob Stein Weighs in on Copyright Law and What May Constitute 'Fair Use'

When it comes to making "fair use" determinations... "[...] My primary concerns were whether or not my client's unlicensed use of third-party materials was for the purposes of criticism, commentary, news reporting, scholarship, or research, and, further, whether my client was using the 'heart' of the 'borrowed' material, and whether he could use less of the 'borrowed' material and still achieve his objective." 

And coming up with his own informal guideline... "I'd seen opinions which held that the defendant's borrowing of 5% or 10% or more of a copyrighted work did not constitute fair use, but I'd never seen an opinion holding that 1% or less was not fair use. So I tried to get my clients to limit their taking of copyrighted film or music to 1% or less of the original, even though that 1% standard is nowhere to be found in the Copyright Act or any judicial opinion I have seen." 
 

Replay 

Our Replay pick for this issue is the Build Your Business with a Book episode "How Do I Get Blurbs for My Book?" with host Anna David (Jan. 27, 2021).

This podcast is great for authors who are looking for advice on marketing and promoting their books--especially those who may be new to the publishing industry or who publish with small or independent presses (and so maybe don't have publicists working with or for them).  

This episode focuses on the important "Dos and Don'ts" of asking other well-known authors for blurbs. (Spoiler: It's not an honor for them.) David shares advice and vignettes, including a past faux pas from when she was new to all of this herself. 

Talk To Us

We built LiveWriters to serve writers, readers, publishers, and the podcasting community. Since you are our audience, please let us know what we can do to make LiveWriters better. Send suggestions, ideas, and any criticisms that will improve LiveWriters and make it a better and more useful experience to David Wilk at david@livewriters.com.

If you like what we are doing, please share the site with your friends. You can follow us on Twitter @livewriters.

And if you'd like to advertise to an audience that loves books and reading, or if you'd like to become a sponsor, write to david@livewriters.com.

Thanks for all your support and for being part of this community.

-David

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Copyright (C) 2021 LiveWriters. All rights reserved.

You are receiving this email because you opted in via our website.

 

LiveWriters
286 Curtis Ave
Stratford, CT 06615-7613

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February 9, 2021


Podcast Profile

 

LiveWriters chats with Carol Fitzgerald of "Bookreporter Talks to"




Q: What energizes and motivates you to create each new episode of the “Bookreporter Talks To” podcast? How do you keep it fresh every time? 
 

 


A: I spend a lot of time thinking about what readers will want to learn from our interview. As I read a book to prep for an interview, I dog-ear the pages as I think about plot, character, and even phrasing that I want to explore with the author. Each author is different, and each book is different. If it’s a debut author, there is a chance that they have not done a number of interviews, so putting them at ease is a big part of the conversation. With an established author, I want to present their work framed against the rest of what they have done. In addition to reading the book, I do research, and watch and listen to other interviews that the author has done, with an eye on making ours memorable. I always have questions prepared in advance, and I try to set them up so the conversation moves along naturally. Each author has his or her own story to tell, and I see my role as allowing them to tell that story to our listeners in a way that will either bring the listener to say, “I want to read that book,” or “I know someone who would want to read that book.” To keep it fresh, I always am trying to think of the question that no one else has asked. The one where the author will pause and think, “That’s a question I always have wanted to answer.”

Q: Who is a guest you especially enjoyed hosting, and why? 
A: We’ve had so many great authors as guests that it’s difficult to pick just one. In November we hosted our first “Bookaccino Live” Book Group, which is a new addition to our usual “Bookreporter Talks To” interviews. The conversation with Jeanine Cummins about American Dirt was so in-depth--and wide-ranging. She got to tell the story that she wanted to share about the book, and that was very meaningful to us.  Then a couple of weeks ago, we hosted William Kent Krueger in that same format and he commented later, “How comfortable and enjoyable it was just chatting, as if we weren't being watched but just carrying on a conversation between good friends. Thanks so much for setting that relaxed atmosphere.” I loved that feedback as it sums up the ambiance that I hope to create. Among the 80 interviews that we have done to date, there have been memorable moments from each one; I literally can quote some special “aha moment” from each conversation. I am looking at our upcoming lineup and am excited about those as well.

Q: What is something you have gained from experience that you wish you would have known from the start? 
A: Sound will change according to where you record. When we first started “Bookreporter Talks To,” we were recording live and in-person in our New York office. Last March when the pandemic hit, we did a quick pivot to Zoom and we recorded on video, as well as audio for the podcast. We found that being able to see the person we are interviewing is much better than just recording audio. You can see what they’re reacting to, and from there you can change up the conversation. You can get listeners who also want to watch. BUT the acoustics at my home studio were very different from the office, and it took time to get the setup right. The way light and sound work in different settings is not to be underestimated.

 

Podcast News


 

Book Pages 

Replay 

Our Replay pick for this issue is the LaVar Burton Reads episode "'Silver Door Diner' by Bishop Garrison" with host LaVar Burton (Feb. 2, 2021).

This podcast is worth listening to for the soothing sound of Burton's voice alone, but its charm is more extensive than that. Burton's motivation for creating the series is as wholesome as anyone would guess: He just wants to share great short stories with his listeners. 

This episode is a reading of Bishop Garrison's "Silver Door Diner," published in FIYAH #16: Joy. Garrison's story is an ambitious combination of science fiction, apocalyptic fiction, love story, and allegory. Dire as things seem, it ends on a hopeful note. Give it a listen and see for yourself. 

Talk To Us

We built LiveWriters to serve writers, readers, publishers, and the podcasting community. Since you are our audience, please let us know what we can do to make LiveWriters better. Send suggestions, ideas, and any criticisms that will improve LiveWriters and make it a better and more useful experience to David Wilk at david@livewriters.com.

If you like what we are doing, please share the site with your friends. You can follow us on Twitter @livewriters.

And if you'd like to advertise to an audience that loves books and reading, or if you'd like to become a sponsor, write to david@livewriters.com.

Thanks for all your support and for being part of this community.

-David

Tweet Tweet
Forward Forward
Twitter
Website
LinkedIn

Copyright (C) 2021 LiveWriters. All rights reserved.

You are receiving this email because you opted in via our website.

 

LiveWriters
286 Curtis Ave
Stratford, CT 06615-7613

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January 26, 2021

Logo

Introducing LiveWriters

Q&A with founder David Wilk

Q: What are the main features of the LiveWriters website?

A: LiveWriters is primarily a curated collection of podcasts, all related to books, in three categories—about books for readers, about writing for writers, and about publishing for publishers and writers. And of course, many of the podcasts we feature cross over either in content or interest, so anyone interested in books and writing can find compelling and entertaining podcasts related to books and writing.

Q: What podcast services can people connect with through the site?

A: We're a discovery site for listeners, so we hope you will find podcasts here you like and then go listen to them wherever you listen to podcasts. But if you are a podcaster, or want to learn how to podcast, we feature a variety of resources and information, and we can help you directly—just ask us.

Q: What is one thing you wish you would have known as a first-time podcaster?

A: Everything I know about podcasting I learned by doing. The technical elements of podcasting have been the most challenging to learn, especially distribution. But when I started podcasting at writerscast.com in 2008, there were far fewer resources available than today, so what I was up against then is simply not an issue today. That is a great thing.

Podcast News

Book Pages

Replay

Our Replay pick for this issue is Writer Writer Pants on Fire’s “Indie Author Len Joy on Publishing Later in Life” with host Mindy McGinnis (Jan. 12, 2021).

The podcast covers everything from craft to publishing to marketing, but this particular episode is noteworthy due to its breadth and the inspiration Joy offers to listeners. His life’s journey from young businessman to published author and triathlete in his 50s reminds mid- and later-life writers that it’s okay not to make any “30 under 30” lists. Joy also has great advice about the value of experience and fortitude, and what not to take away from writing workshops. After listening, you’ll feel optimistic about your current writing project. You might even go for a jog.

Talk To Us

We built LiveWriters to serve writers, readers, publishers, and the podcasting community. Since you are our audience, please let us know what we can do to make LiveWriters better. Send suggestions, ideas, and any criticisms that will improve LiveWriters and make it a better and more useful experience to David Wilk at david@livewriters.com.

If you like what we are doing, please share the site with your friends. You can follow us on Twitter @livewriters.

And if you'd like to advertise to an audience that loves books and reading, or if you'd like to become a sponsor, write to david@livewriters.com.

Thanks for all your support and for being part of this community.

-David

Write to david@livewriters.com

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